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Processors (Intel® Core™, Intel® Xeon®, etc); processor utilities and programs (Intel® Processor Identification Utility, Intel® Extreme Tuning Utility, Intel® Easy Streaming Wizard, etc.)
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What does scalability mean?

manny8888
Beginner
630 Views
Hi

I'm a rookie. What exactly does CPU scalability mean?
I've seen 1S and 4S. I think this is 1 socket and 4 socket. What exactly does this mean?
Thank you
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1 Solution
AndrewG_Intel
Moderator
552 Views

Hello manny8888


The difference is that a value of 1S means that the processor can be used in a 1-socket system and a processor that supports 4S scalability can be used in a motherboard/server with up to four sockets and so on depending on the scalability of the processor.

 

This is mostly used on servers since the motherboards commonly have 2 sockets, 4 sockets, etc depending on the motherboard manufacturer (OEM). This will allow to scale up to handle more load on the system with 2 or 4 units that will allow using more than the processor.

 

It is important to check what configuration you would like to perform, for instance, if you are planning to use 2 processors then you need to verify that the processor supports the scalability of two processors and check with the OEM to see which processors it supports and if you can or not mix processors (commonly not recommended) since it could not work and you have to use same models if planning to use 2 CPUs. However, the Intel® Core™ i9-12900K Processor can work only in 1 socket as it says on the Product Specifications website (Ark).

 

Another thing that OEMs use second processors is that it allows using more hardware of the board like PCIe lanes, DIMMs, and add more hardware as controlled by the second unit, etc depending on the manufacturer of the motherboard.


We hope this clarifies your inquiries.

Best regards,

Andrew G.

Intel Customer Support Technician


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8 Replies
AndrewG_Intel
Moderator
615 Views

Hello @manny8888

Thank you for posting on the Intel® communities.


In order to provide you with the most accurate information, could you please confirm the Intel® Processor models (SKUs) that relate to your inquiry or environment?

Also, just to make sure we are on the same page, could you please let us know where you saw the information about "1S and 4S". Please feel free to share links or screenshots as a reference.


Best regards,

Andrew G.

Intel Customer Support Technician


manny8888
Beginner
609 Views

Hi @AndrewG_Intel 

 

Thank you for the reply.

 

No problem.  I can provide those details.

 

Intel Xeon Gold 5222 lists "4S" for scalability:

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/sku/192445/intel-xeon-gold-5222-processor-16-5m-cac...

 

Intel Core i9-12900K lists "1S Only" for scalability:

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/sku/134599/intel-core-i912900k-processor-30m-cache-...

 

In plain English, what does this mean?  It comes back to what exactly does "scalability" mean in the context of CPUs.  I am deciding between these two CPUs so I need to know what this means.

 

Thank you

 

AndrewG_Intel
Moderator
577 Views

Hello manny8888

Thank you for your response. Please allow us to review this further and we will be posting back in the thread as soon as more details are available.


Best regards,

Andrew G.

Intel Customer Support Technician


AndrewG_Intel
Moderator
553 Views

Hello manny8888


The difference is that a value of 1S means that the processor can be used in a 1-socket system and a processor that supports 4S scalability can be used in a motherboard/server with up to four sockets and so on depending on the scalability of the processor.

 

This is mostly used on servers since the motherboards commonly have 2 sockets, 4 sockets, etc depending on the motherboard manufacturer (OEM). This will allow to scale up to handle more load on the system with 2 or 4 units that will allow using more than the processor.

 

It is important to check what configuration you would like to perform, for instance, if you are planning to use 2 processors then you need to verify that the processor supports the scalability of two processors and check with the OEM to see which processors it supports and if you can or not mix processors (commonly not recommended) since it could not work and you have to use same models if planning to use 2 CPUs. However, the Intel® Core™ i9-12900K Processor can work only in 1 socket as it says on the Product Specifications website (Ark).

 

Another thing that OEMs use second processors is that it allows using more hardware of the board like PCIe lanes, DIMMs, and add more hardware as controlled by the second unit, etc depending on the manufacturer of the motherboard.


We hope this clarifies your inquiries.

Best regards,

Andrew G.

Intel Customer Support Technician


manny8888
Beginner
543 Views
Hi @AndrewG_Intel

Thank you. I think I got it now. Core i9 only allow one cpu per machine but Xeon allows more than 1 cpu per machine. This makes i9 to not be scalable but Xeon is. Is this correct?

Does Intel provide any benchmark testing so people can compare their cpus? If not, is there a reliable third party resource that can provide the benchmark testing?

Thank you
AndrewG_Intel
Moderator
499 Views

Hello manny8888

Thank you for your response.

 

In regards to your questions:

1- "Core i9 only allow one cpu per machine but Xeon allows more than 1 cpu per machine. This makes i9 to not be scalable but Xeon is. Is this correct?"

Yes, your understanding is correct.

 

2- "Does Intel provide any benchmark testing so people can compare their cpus? If not, is there a reliable third party resource that can provide the benchmark testing?"

The Intel® Product Performance website may be helpful to check testing information of our performance and power claims. It is intended to provide enough detail to enable more sophisticated audiences to closely review and evaluate our claims, testing choices, and configurations. 

I did a quick review and you may not find a specific "one-to-one" test between the two CPUs you are interested in; however, all the information there may be useful to help you with your purchasing decisions.

Please refer to this link for performance benchmark information for 2nd Generation Intel® Xeon® Scalable Processors.

Check this other link for performance benchmark information regarding 12th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors.

 

We don't comment on third-party products or websites. So if you would like to look for additional, different, or specific benchmark tests, you could search on forums dedicated to those topics to gather more information.

For specific information on benchmarking results of a particular program(s), please contact the developers of the third-party software you're interested in running. They may already have benchmarking results or may confirm if there's a particular software limitation, or possibly give other suggestions.

 

Here are other links that may be useful to compare features and specifications:

 

I hope this helps.

Best regards,

Andrew G.

Intel Customer Support Technician

 

manny8888
Beginner
481 Views
AndrewG_Intel
Moderator
464 Views

Hello manny8888

Thank you for your response, we're happy to help!


Since the thread has been marked as "Solved" and there are no additional questions, we will proceed to close this request now. If you need any additional information, please submit a new question as this thread will no longer be monitored.

It has been a pleasure to assist you.


Sincerely,

Andrew G.

Intel Customer Support Technician


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