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PatrickJK
Beginner
450 Views

What Fortran Intel compiler I can purchase that is closest to the Intel one I purchased in the past?

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Dear all,

I have purchased in 2013, and used ever since, Intel® Visual Fortran Composer XE for Windows with IMSL (I still have the original email with the license number, the serial number and the download key).

The laptop on which I installed the compiler no longer boots unfortunately. I now have a new laptop. I have a couple of questions:

1) Is there any way I could use the license I purchased (it was an educational license) for an additional installation of the compiler? Could I renew it at a fee? If I click on the old download key, I run into an error.

2) If not, what is the compiler you offer that is closest to the Intel® Visual Fortran Composer XE for Windows with IMSL, which I had purchased? I am afraid about the replicability of results across different versions of the compiler.

Thank you in advance for your help.

Best,

Patrick

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Ronald_G_Intel
Moderator
252 Views

If you purchase a new license for oneAPI you will have access to the latest compiler from the oneAPI Toolkits.  You will neeed Base ToolKit for Debugger and MKL, and HPC Toolkit for the Fortran compiler itself.  Your license will enable you to download the older Parallel Studio XE Toolkits BUT only those that are supported:  https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/articles/intel-parallel-studio-xe-supported-and...

 

You will note that very old versions like your previous compiler cannot be downloaded.  Besides, you'd need XP or Win7 on your laptop and a VS 2010 installation for the old compiler. even if you could find it.  It will not work on Win10 and VS2017 or 2019.

IMSL, as noted, is no longer available from Intel in any download.  You will have to purchase IMSL from their vendor directly.  As noted, Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL) has similar functionality and is included in all our downloads from Intel, no extra cost over that of the compiler.  However you will have to re-code your IMSL calls to MKL calls.  If you don't want to recode you will need to purchase IMSL separately.

 

You can download and install the oneAPI Base and HPC toolkits today.  there is no licensing.  SUPPORT is what you can purchase and gets you the ability to download older products, subject to the supported products webpage listed above, and you get Premier Support which gives you direct access to Intel support for your compiler.  WHERE TO BUY

So to get started, install Visual Studio 2019 and include the C++ components in Visual Studio.  These are needed.  Then download and install oneAPI Base Toolkit and install that - use CUSTOM install and install debugger and MKL, and any of the other tools that interest you.  then download and install HPC Toolkit and install the Fortran compiler.  THEN go buy and install IMSL.

Basekit https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/tools/oneapi/base-toolkit.html

HPC kit: https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/tools/oneapi/hpc-toolkit.html

any further questions?

 

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18 Replies
mecej4
Black Belt
404 Views

Many things have changed over the past eight years, and you could take one of three or more paths. 

  1. If you know your old serial number, Intel ID and the Email address that you used in 2013, you can contact the Intel OSC and request downloads for the compiler and IMSL and, possibly, a new license file. You may also need to obtain an older version of Visual Studio, such as VS2012, and install it before attempting to install the Intel packages. The code generated by this old version of the compiler would not exploit the faster instruction repertoire of a more recent CPU. You will get to cope with bugs in the old software that were fixed in later versions of the compiler and IMSL.
  2. You may obtain and install VS2019 and the new OneAPI HPC Fortran package, and you will probably qualify to obtain both at no cost. You will have to obtain a new version of IMSL from Perforce.
  3. As in 2., but you can see if you can replace calls to IMSL with calls to replacement functions from other libraries, including MKL (which Intel provides as part of OneAPI). If you list the IMSL routines that you use, we may be able to suggest replacements.
PatrickJK
Beginner
373 Views

Hi mecej4,

Thank you very much for your reply. I would rather install exactly the same old compiler to be able to replicate my old work results. I contacted Intel OSC only to receive an automatic answer that my support has expired so the request cannot be examined.  I hope to be able to reach out to someone from Intel who can help me  through my post here.

Thanks again,

Patrick

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jimdempseyatthecove
Black Belt
346 Views

The laptop on which I installed the compiler no longer boots unfortunately. I now have a new laptop.

You can open your old laptop and pull out its hard drive. Then order/pick up a USB to your HD interface adapter (~$10-$20). With luck, the HD will be readable.

This is under the assumption that you kept the Intel installation archive on the notebook HD (I do).

That is one of your issues. The second issue, is to obtain an MS VS of the older vintage.

Jim Dempsey

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JohnNichols
Valued Contributor I
332 Views

I would suggest that you bite the bullet, an expression from the war when they amputated shot legs and you had to bite on something to stop you biting your tongue off with the pain.  If you want to see a classic example there is Sean Penn doing the amputation in Professor and the Madman.  Both would make excellent Fortran programmers.  Great movie. 

Set it up in a VM if you must and try VS2019 preview and the latest Intel Compiler, which is free and see what fixes you need to make.  You have the forum and the MKL forum to help. 

Relying on old software such as VS2012 that is out of support is a bad idea and unless you are in your 60s you are going to have to do it sooner or later. 

Of course if I had a 15 year old daughter with a computer I would give her 100 dollars and see if she could do it - promise 100 more on success and most young people will walk on broken glass for 200 dollars.  You could teach her the Fortran she would need in about an hour, I showed my 13 year old daughter a kludge recently to fix something in windows and as I walked past 3 days later she was doing the kludge without asking.  I have not touched her computer for a year and she keeps in pretty up to date

Interestingly the latest VS2019 preview has added to the search feature that now provides a list of the file types you want to search in the whole solution.  The installed version does not include Fortran extensions - you have to add them.  

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Steve_Lionel
Black Belt Retired Employee
317 Views

IMSL is the harder problem. Of course, one can buy IMSL directly from RogueWave, but I'd suggest seeing if the routines from IMSL that are used have equivalents in the Intel Math Kernel Library (free) or in some other available library. You might get lucky.

My opinion is that it was wrong for Intel to just pretend they never sold IMSL, making it impossible for customers with valid licenses to reinstall what they bought, but there may have been some legal issue involved (this all happened after I retired.)

 
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Barbara_P_Intel
Moderator
290 Views

Are you running the version of Windows you had on the old laptop on your new laptop?  A compiler that old is not likely to run successfully on Windows 10.

 

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PatrickJK
Beginner
262 Views

Hi Barbara,
As I explained in my message I have a new laptop -- Windows 10 Education, ver 2004. I have a server where I have installed Intel® Parallel Studio XE 2016 Composer Edition for Fortran Windows with Rogue Wave IMSL 7.0.1.

Could you please provide an answer to the two questions I asked in my post? I am happy to upgrade the compiler if that's what I have to do. Which one should I buy? Does the previous license allows for a discount at least?

Sincerely,

Patrick

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PatrickJK
Beginner
260 Views

Dear Steve,

You are spot on. Intel has repeatedly bounced back even just any request of clarification of my license rights on grounds that since the support warranty has expired, they have no obligation to reply. I am quite disappointed.

Thank you for your post,

Patrick

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PatrickJK
Beginner
254 Views

Hi John,

I did "bite the bullet" as you suggest and upgraded the compiler on servers I use. I am investigating the replicability of certain old results obtained with that compiler for academic research purposes.

Thank you for your post,

Patrick

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PatrickJK
Beginner
261 Views

Hi Jim,

Yes, I am after the second issue. Unfortunately nothing much could be recovered from the old laptop.

Thank you for your post and your help.

Sincerely, 

Patrick

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Ronald_G_Intel
Moderator
253 Views

If you purchase a new license for oneAPI you will have access to the latest compiler from the oneAPI Toolkits.  You will neeed Base ToolKit for Debugger and MKL, and HPC Toolkit for the Fortran compiler itself.  Your license will enable you to download the older Parallel Studio XE Toolkits BUT only those that are supported:  https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/articles/intel-parallel-studio-xe-supported-and...

 

You will note that very old versions like your previous compiler cannot be downloaded.  Besides, you'd need XP or Win7 on your laptop and a VS 2010 installation for the old compiler. even if you could find it.  It will not work on Win10 and VS2017 or 2019.

IMSL, as noted, is no longer available from Intel in any download.  You will have to purchase IMSL from their vendor directly.  As noted, Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL) has similar functionality and is included in all our downloads from Intel, no extra cost over that of the compiler.  However you will have to re-code your IMSL calls to MKL calls.  If you don't want to recode you will need to purchase IMSL separately.

 

You can download and install the oneAPI Base and HPC toolkits today.  there is no licensing.  SUPPORT is what you can purchase and gets you the ability to download older products, subject to the supported products webpage listed above, and you get Premier Support which gives you direct access to Intel support for your compiler.  WHERE TO BUY

So to get started, install Visual Studio 2019 and include the C++ components in Visual Studio.  These are needed.  Then download and install oneAPI Base Toolkit and install that - use CUSTOM install and install debugger and MKL, and any of the other tools that interest you.  then download and install HPC Toolkit and install the Fortran compiler.  THEN go buy and install IMSL.

Basekit https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/tools/oneapi/base-toolkit.html

HPC kit: https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/tools/oneapi/hpc-toolkit.html

any further questions?

 

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jimdempseyatthecove
Black Belt
231 Views

Sorry the HD recovery didn't work.

FWIW last summer, my Lenovo notebook motherboard died. I suspect this came from a BIOS update that came along with a Windows update relating to the USB as the system wouldn't boot after that update. I had a lot of stuff on that notebook as it was used at customer's sites for embedded programming, not to mention a bunch of personal stuff.

Luckily, the HD was still readable using a USB adapter. Sorry it did not work for you.

Jim Dempsey

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mecej4
Black Belt
190 Views

Browsing the Roguewave site reveals that IMSL Fortran 7.x reached "End of availability for sale" in October 2019. The oldest version available for sale as of now is IMSL 2018.

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PatrickJK
Beginner
149 Views

Dear Ronald,

So in short you are saying:

1) I need to buy a new compiler and the old license does not qualify me for any discount?

2) The steps you suggest are:

i) Install Visual Studio 2019 and include the C++ components in Visual Studio (from where?);

ii) Download and install oneAPI Base Toolkit and install that - use CUSTOM install and install debugger and MKL, and any of the other tools that interest you (is this the only license I need to purchase?);

iii) Download and install HPC Toolkit and install the Fortran compiler:

iv) Buy and install IMSL.

Is this correct? Why do I need C++ components for installing Fortran?

Thanks,

Patrick

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PatrickJK
Beginner
139 Views

Thank you: I did not know.

Patrick

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PatrickJK
Beginner
133 Views

Hi Jim,

Thank you for your post: I am glad it worked for you.

Best,

Patrick

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Ronald_G_Intel
Moderator
126 Views

1) The compiler can be downloaded and installed for free.  As I said, if you want SUPPORT you buy a SUPPORT license "SUPPORT is what you can purchase and gets you the ability to download older products, subject to the supported products webpage listed above, and you get Premier Support which gives you direct access to Intel support for your compiler.  WHERE TO BUY"

Since your license is so old it does not qualify for special Renewal pricing.  You can purchase a Support Serial at full cost IF YOU SO CHOOSE.  You are welcome to use it for free if you get your support from this user forum.

MS VS 2019- from Microsoft.  Search for 'Visual Studio Community Edition' and read it's licensing to see if you qualify for this edition.  Try HERE

Steps above are correct.  We use the C libraries for things like math functions SIN, COS, etc.  amongst other useful function in Microsoft's C library.  Why reinvent the wheel and possibly introduce bugs?  Safer and easier to pick those up from the platform C library.  We do the same on Linux and Mac - use the system C lib. 

Toolkits - as I said, there is no license you have to buy - download and install.  If you want Support purchase that.

 

 

mecej4
Black Belt
85 Views

Patrick, regarding your question above, "Why do I need C++ components for installing Fortran?" :

Many of the tools such as the linker, librarian, manifest tool, etc., as well as the Microsoft C/C++ libraries that Ron mentioned, as well as Visual Studio, are required for Intel Fortran to work. Similarly, on Linux, Intel Fortran as well as Gfortran depend on system libraries and tools (such as the linker LD) that are supplied for and used by GCC/G++.