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11900k Adaptive boost question regarding voltage

Seth-Anton
Novice
1,376 Views

 

Just installed 0902 bios with default settings
The only changes that i made was: 
Ai overclock tuner : XMP I
Intel Adaptive boost technology : Enabled
ASUS Multicore Enhancement : Enabled - Remove All limits

Everything is fine, system is ultra stable and i am reaching 5.1ghz at all cores on Cinebench R23 ( multi core stress)
But while i was playing Microsoft Flight Simulator i was checking VCORE values which sometimes have a spike to 1.47v with a main value range  between 1.35 to 1.45v
Is this normal and safe for 11900K? V-core is at default offset mode. Based on Intel's documentation this is not overclocking so i guess those voltages are ok ?

my PC spec: ASUS ROG MAXIMUS XIII HERO, Intel Core i9-11900K, G.Skill Ripjaws V 64GB DDR4 K2,ASUS ROG STRIX GeForce RTX3090 GAMING OC


thanks

 

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10 Replies
DeividA_Intel
Moderator
1,346 Views

Hello Seth-Anton, 

  


Thank you for posting on the Intel® communities.   



I would like to let you know that based on the datasheet your processor can handle up to 1.52V (of course, is better to have it running under this voltage), you can see it in the following link: 11th Generation Intel® Core™ Processor Family> Volume 1> page 122-123> under "Operating Voltage":


- https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/processors/core/core-technical-resources.html



However, Intel recommends always run the system at the base frequency (CPU=3.50 GHz, RAM=3200 MHz or below), to avoid damage to the unit. Also, for overclocking and voltage settings, I recommend you to get in contact with ASUS for further instructions.





Regards,    


Deivid A. 

Intel Customer Support Technician


Seth-Anton
Novice
1,339 Views

Hi Deivid

Thanks for your reply and support.

So this means that i could use daily the new feature of Intel ( adaptive boost ) with a range of 1.35-145v.

if Intel recommends to run the system at base frequency of 3.50ghz why  then we have Adaptive boost as an option for better performance ?

thanks

Seth

 

 

curthard89
Novice
819 Views

@DeividA_Intel the "However, Intel recommends always run the system at the base frequency (CPU=3.50 GHz, RAM=3200 MHz or below), to avoid damage to the unit. " statement is the biggest load of bull. This is simply not true, please show me the documentation where this is stated.

DeividA_Intel
Moderator
1,324 Views

Hello Seth-Anton, 



Thanks for your reply.



As you mentioned in your previous post, the Intel® Adaptive Boost Technology is an option that improves the gaming performance. This should not damage your system since it works similar to the Turbo boost, however, make sure that the CPU is not running always above the base frequency.



If the processor is always running above the base frequeb=ncy, this with time can damage the processor itself, just keep the Intel® Adaptive Boost Technology enable when is needed or try to monitor the frequency of your CPU from time to time.


For safe overclocking instructions or recommendations, please get in contact with your motherboard manufacturer.





Regards,   


Deivid A. 

Intel Customer Support Technician


Seth-Anton
Novice
1,313 Views

Hi Deivid 

 

When PC is on idle mode i am always trying to use Balanced power plan which decreases core speed even below 3.5ghz ( 800mhz).

I will continue using adaptive boost when playing Microsoft Flight Simulator or working with Adobe Photoshop,Lightroom etc.

As I mentioned above my system is ultra stable, no crashes and great stability so far. Looks like 11900k works great with Asus Maximus Hero XIII + Corsair H150i 360mm liquid cpu cooler.

thanks for all info & support again

best

Seth

 

 

DeividA_Intel
Moderator
1,298 Views

Hello Seth-Anton, 



I am glad that the information provided was helpful for you and that the system is running properly. The situation described for you is a safety example of how to use the feature. Remember to get in contact with the motherboard manufacturer for further instructions if you need them.



I will proceed to close the thread, but if you need any help or if you have any other inquiries do not hesitate to open a new thread to get proper support.




Regards,  

  

Deivid A. 

Intel Customer Support Technician 


SDMF74
Novice
862 Views

omg is this actually an Intel employee who said this? A technician nonetheless!  quote "If the processor is always running above the base frequency, this with time can damage the processor itself"

You work for Intel and you think that the processor frequency can damage the CPU? lol No.

I think maybe you are confusing cpu frequency with cpu voltage. Frequency doesnt harm a processor. Some people disable speedstep and set windows power plan to high performance which runs their cpu at max forever. I have never heard of anybody having a failed cpu from a high performance power plan or any degradation for that matter.

This is cpu 101. Did you skip every cpu training seminar that your employer offered since you started? Perhaps they should make those mandatory. 

curthard89
Novice
820 Views

As you stated, high frequency does not damage the CPU, so ignore that statement.

 

Regarding voltage — ideally won't want to be pumping 1.4v+ into that CPU, if you have just touched the core frequency then all its doing is going off the SVID table that is built into the chip to adjust the voltage accordingly. 

The SVID table will be the stock table the CPU will operate at voltage wise given a frequency, now this will be very generous with the voltage so that it will be stable, hence the high vcore.

You will need either give it a negative offset, or ... use adaptive mode, or fixed voltage mode and set a voltage yourself that will be stable.

Also note about LLC when doing this too to counter the vdroop when under load.

Go and run r23 and see what the vcore sits at when under full 100% load, also see what your temps get to after 10 mins of constant r23.

 

tl;dr, don't just set a frequency and let the motherboard give the voltage, it will be stupidly high for no reason, do a manual overclock properly and adjust the voltage yourself.

SDMF74
Novice
803 Views

I agree with your statement about doing an adaptive overclock and not just using auto mode or AI OC (which is what I see alot of people doing ).
But you said don't pump 1.4v+ into the cpu?
This is an 11900k how is that possible? By saying that you are basically saying the same thing as the intel employee except in a less ignorant way (no offence). What I mean is and since you mentioned the vid table I will put it a slightly different way, if you look at the vf curve of any 11900k the vf curve of 5,000mhz and above is going to be over 1.4v. At boost frequencies its 1.5v. There is no way you are going to be stable using Adaptive boost or 53x at under 1.4v

11th Gen Intel handles much higher voltage than any previous Intel chip. With that being said 1.5v must be safe for 24/7 use.

I do have one question though maybe somebody here or someone in the future can answer.
I have noticed that my chip momentarily recieves 100mv-130mv more voltage than what I set in the bios and Im not sure why although I have a couple ideas.
Previously Intel cpus would not exceed the set value in the bios. I have tried using the max cpu voltage celing setting in the bios btw but it is ignored.
I have similar pc specs as the OP.

For instance I can set an all core oc of 52x at 1.5v or a 54x3/53x5/52x8 per core oc at 1.5v using Adaptive mode (w/ 45x cache) and my cpu runs much lower like 1.34v or so under load (LLC4) but I always notice that HWINFO64's "max vcore column" shows like 1.634v. Now this is just a very short microsecond spike I'm sure because it never sits at that voltage but I always leave hwinfo64 running on a second monitor and after the pc is running for 30 minutes or so at desktop or screensaver it usually shows the voltage overshoot. I can also make it happen by simply running a Very short memory stability test with AIDA64. Btw I also have IA AC/DC loadlines set to .16mohm.

Maybe someone here can test this for me? Asus offers a free year of Aida64 or you can download a 30 day trial. Simply start a memory stress test with just memory or memory and cache selected and let it run for 5 minutes also with hwinfo64 running to record your max vcore during the run then come back here and report what your vcore is set in the bios and your frequency OC and lastly what hwinfo64 showed as your max vcore during the aida64 stability test?
I'm curious to see if it shows more than what you set in the bios and by how much? Thanks!

SDMF74
Novice
462 Views

Nobody seems to be able to answer this question, apparently not even Intel. Thats unfortunate

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