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JMize2
Beginner
773 Views

New I9-9900 crashes on loading Windows 10 Setup

Just installed a new i9-9900 (non K) processor in a MSI Gaming Plus Z390 motherboard. Have the bare minimum config, with one stick of ram, no graphics card or any additional. Bios page loads and looks fine, but when starting Win 10 installation via a flash drive, it gets just past the loading animation, and crashes and reboots at the language page. It'll do this in a loop if allowed to.

 

Contacted MSI, and they suggested updating the BIOS to a new one not yet listed on the site. Installed, cleared settings, and same result. Used the MS tool to make a new install drive using another USB key, same. MSI, while quick to respond, seems to be out of suggestions. I'd be grateful if anyone has a suggestion.

 

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18 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
344 Views

This feels like bad memory. Set up a flash disk with MemTest86+ and, if it will boot, let it run for a couple of hours (preferably a full day).

...S​

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

Hi Scott,

Thought about that. Originally had two new 16gb sticks. Removed one, tried it, and then the other. Same result. I might just give memtest a go. But two new bad Ballistix sticks would really surprise me.

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

On a whim, I remembered that I had a bootable version of Linux Mint on a flash drive. Sure enough, it comes up and runs fine. Gimp loads crazy quick.

 

Still perplexing that Windows 10 install does not work.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
344 Views

Are you building your Windows 10 installation media using the Windows Media Creation Tool? If not, you should. You can access it here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10.

 

Hope this helps,

...S

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

Hi Scott,

I did indeed. Just to be sure, I did a build just before attempting installation. In going through my pike `o flash drives, I had a bootable Linux Mint, and that comes up and runs fine. Strange.

 

Good thought though.

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

On a suggestion from MSI, I took a close look at the PGA, and sure enough, there is a pin out of place. Bought this board at FRY's, and it had clearly been opened. The salesman said it was no big deal, as they sometimes show the board to a customer. I should have known this was a red flag. Fry's will not likely see another dollar from me.

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

Well the plot has surely thickened. I managed to get a replacement of the MSI motherboard. Carefully moving the processor to the new board, I thought I was on the way! Nope. The symptom is exactly the same! Crashes to a reboot just as the setup page loads. Tried multiple ports, flash drives, etc. Interestingly, I disabled turbo mode in the bios on a whim, and Win 10 setup loaded! Installation was finally underway, unfortunately it eventually fails in a reboot loop. I do know about removed the flash drive btw.

 

So, it can only be one of several things. An overall bug in this series of motherboards. Probably not. A memory issue? I tried each stick independently, so I doubt they are both defective. They could however not play nice with this board/chipset. A bad CPU? Or maybe a power supply issue?

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
344 Views

Have you updated the BIOS on this new board to the latest available version? Can you do this from flash (i.e. without requiring Windows to be installed)?

...S

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

Thanks Scott. Yes indeed. MSI has a flash function within the BIOS settings. I even updated it to a yet unreleased BIOS as per MSI tech. While I was sitting here this morning, pulling my hair out, I called Crucial to see if they had anything to offer. After describing the situation to the agent, he felt the memory was to blame, and suggested replacement with a faster set. The fact that Windows installer would not load at all until turbo was shut off might be an indicator.

 

The sticks are on the way and should be here before the evening is out. I will follow up with the results.

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

New DDR4 3000 Corsair memory yields exactly the same result. Crash on Win 10 install start screen, or almost completing Win 10 install by disabling Turbo, and then crash/restart before install completes. Must be a bad processor, or a design flaw in the mobo. Probably the latter.

 

Again, and oddly enough, it boots and runs Linux Mint.

 

Anyone know of an email contact for processor support? I see phone and chat, but much rather do email.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
344 Views

Well, I would call it a limitation, not a flaw - and I would certainly blame the motherboard before I would the processor (there's a reason why I won't purchase MSI equipment). Still, Intel only guarantees that this processor will run at 2666 MHz and, while we see reports of far higher memory speeds (including DDR4-4000) being successfully used, this is almost exclusively with the K processor.

 

If, from BIOS, you lock the memory to run at, say, 2666 MHz, do you see the same issues?

 

...S

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

Hi Scott,

Thanks again. The first set of ram sticks were 2666, and were running that that speed. The new ram is 3000, but the motherboard chooses to run it at 2133 for some reason oddly enough. Not sure why it isn't 2666, but the result is no different.

 

I should also mention that I don't intend to try to overclock ram. I bought the non K processor for that reason. I was just hoping the higher spec ram might solve the problem.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
344 Views

Typically, if the motherboard (well, the BIOS) is unable to initialize the memory at the highest speed, it will back off and retry at some lower/default speed (typically 2133). This happens automatically. In some cases, the attempt to initialize the memory simply fails. In other cases, it will appear to succeed. Once an attempt is made to use this memory, the bus could lock up. This is detected by the BIOS and used for the retry decision. in this latter case, you won't receive any visual indication that this has happened. It might be noticeable by how long BIOS POST takes to complete, however.

 

If you cannot get consistent operation by disabling automatic memory initialization and setting it manually to a specific speed (like 2133), then all I can suggest is that you replace this 3000 memory with other 2666 memory. If this also fails, you need to look at whether the board or processor is damaged or failing. Since you've already replaced the motherboard, maybe you should look at replacing the processor...

 

If you would like to look at getting a replacement processor, you should first verify that your warranty is still active (here: Determine if Your Product Is Still Under Warranty). Then, you need to directly contact Intel Customer Support to initiate the RMA process (you cannot do this through the forums). Here are pages where you can lookup contact information, including local phone numbers, by geography:

 

 

You can use the online forms service or email, but I actually recommend calling them directly. The above links provide local or toll-free numbers in most countries and support most local languages. You could also use the chat service (start here: Intel Customer Support Chat), but understand that this service is offered in English only and is subject to the normal (9:00-5:00 M-F) office hours in the Pacific (UTC-8) time zone.

 

Hope this helps,

...S

David_V_Intel
Employee
344 Views

Hello JMize2,

 

Thank you for posting on the Intel ® communities.

 

I see that the issue persists even after replacing the motherboard and the RAM, I can also see that you are able to run Linux*. Have you actually installed that distribution in the target hard drive you want for boot or are you booting directly from the USB? 

 

If possible, use a different USB flash drive, re-format it and then create the bootable device using Microsoft's tool, you can find it in the link below: 

 

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

 

*NOTE: Click where it says "Download tool now".* 

 

After creating this fresh bootable USB, proceed with the installation once more to see if the issue persists.

 

 

David V

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

A Contingent Worker at Intel

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

David,

 

I have already done this. Several times in fact. Using three drives, including two brand new ones. All new builds. A sandisk and a samsung. As for the Linux, it is bootable Mint from a flash drive. Please note, I do not want Linux, I just tried this to see what happens. I need Windows 10.

David_V_Intel
Employee
344 Views

Hello JMize2,

 

Thank you for your response.

 

I would like to know the BIOS version your replacement motherboard came with. This information is important to check possible BIOS incompatibility. Try accessing the BIOS and check for the version, if not up-to-date, please attempt to update the BIOS. Refer to the link below: 

 

https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/support/MPG-Z390-GAMING-PLUS#support-cpu

 

* Please be aware that the content on that site is not controlled by Intel*. This information is offered for your convenience and should not be viewed as an endorsement by Intel* for the merchants or services offered there. * 

 

I would recommend installing the v16 which appears to be the latest one released. Once done, check to see if the crash still happens. 

 

If it does happen, please provide me with the following:

 

- RAM model part number:

- HDD and/or SSD model and part number: 

 

 

David V

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

A Contingent Worker at Intel

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

I had initially installed V16 when the first crash occurred. MSI offered a not yet public V17, which I then installed. No difference. As for memory,

there were two different sets of sticks. The current set is Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2X8 pair CMK16GX4M2B3000C15. The SSD is a Crucial 1TB CT1000MX500SSD1.

Worthing noting that this drive was used in another machine for several months with no issues.

 

JMize2
Beginner
344 Views

I don't want to be the guy that finally solves a problem, and never posts the solution. I have searched so many forums over the years to do that to someone else. Turns out, it was the power supply. This was confirmed by switching out a known good 750W supply from a working machine. Even ran Prime95 just to give it a hard test, and it ran like a champ. Interesting that neither Intel, MSI, or Crucial made mention of this as a possible cause. It is a very weird and specific type of load based failure.

 

On an unrelated note, I was assuming the included cooler would work fine since I do not intend to overclock. Nope! This silly piece of junk allowed temps to reach into the 90s! It had slipped my mind, but I ran into the same exactly problem with my i7 4790. The stock fan is fine as long as you don't intend to run any applications. 😉

 

Thanks to the folks that took the time to respond.

 

 

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