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Xeon High/Low Priority Cores

jadynbowen
Beginner
3,872 Views

When a Xeon processor states that it has high-priority cores and low-priority cores, does that just mean some cores are higher performance (as in performance cores vs. efficiency cores)? Or does that mean certain cores actually have different interrupt/affinity capabilities?

For example, I want to use the Xeon Gold 6444Y for a real-time simulation machine. The simulation isolates cores and assigns a single thread to each core (I'm using pthreads). If the high-priority/low-priority is just marketing terminology for cores that are "better" or "worse," then that's not an issue. I can just assign the less-intensive threads to the lower-performing cores. I'm concerned, however, that the low-priority cores are actually going to be pre-empted more (or something).

Thanks!

1 Solution
Allan_A_Intel
Moderator
3,829 Views

Hello, jadynbowen,


Thank you for reaching Intel Communities. I will gladly help you.


High-priority cores and low-priority cores are related to the Intel® Speed Select Technology. Depending on your choice and needs, you can set some cores are high-priority cores to give them a turbo frequency that exceeds the nominal turbo frequency limits when all cores are active (Intel® Speed Select Technology - Turbo Frequency), to make them receive the surplus frequency first (Intel® Speed Select Technology - Performance Profile), or applying to them a higher base frequency (Intel® Speed Select Technology – Base Frequency).


You can find more details in the Third Generation Intel® Xeon® Processor Scalable Family On Two Socket Platform Technical Overview: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/developer/articles/technical/third-generation-xeon-scalable-family-overview.html


Best regards,

Allan


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2 Replies
Allan_A_Intel
Moderator
3,830 Views

Hello, jadynbowen,


Thank you for reaching Intel Communities. I will gladly help you.


High-priority cores and low-priority cores are related to the Intel® Speed Select Technology. Depending on your choice and needs, you can set some cores are high-priority cores to give them a turbo frequency that exceeds the nominal turbo frequency limits when all cores are active (Intel® Speed Select Technology - Turbo Frequency), to make them receive the surplus frequency first (Intel® Speed Select Technology - Performance Profile), or applying to them a higher base frequency (Intel® Speed Select Technology – Base Frequency).


You can find more details in the Third Generation Intel® Xeon® Processor Scalable Family On Two Socket Platform Technical Overview: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/developer/articles/technical/third-generation-xeon-scalable-family-overview.html


Best regards,

Allan


jadynbowen
Beginner
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