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i5-13600k safe operating voltages and current

Jack170
Beginner
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Hi, I am trying to figure out the official datasheet for i5-13600k but can't really make sense of some of the parameters (IccMAX vs IccMAX app and various tables for the same type of CPU).

What is the safe vcore voltage for daily use? 1.3V? 1.4V?

What is the safe core cache limit? 200A? 170A?

Is using DDR4 XMP potentially not safe because the datasheet specifies 1.2V for DDR4 memory lane?

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n_scott_pearson
Super User
11,311 Views

Again, Jean has answered the different question - but no, there are no conflicts in what is being said this time... ;^)

XMP profiles come from the DIMMs/SODIMMs themselves. In this case, the XMP profile is saying that 1.35V is required to utilize this profile. Forcibly lowering the voltage while still using this profile is NOT recommended and, in fact, will likely result in memory errors and could result in memory bus hangs. Will this physically damage anything? Unlikely, but that's really not the point. Don't do it.

Hope this helps,

...S

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9 Replies
DeividA_Intel
Employee
11,479 Views

Hello Jack170,  


  

Thank you for posting on the Intel® communities. I understand that you need further information related to the Intel® Core™ i5-13600K Processor voltages.


I would like to let you know that there is no exact value that I can provide you for each processor. The processor has a few internal voltage regulations (FIVR, Digital Linear voltage regulator(DLVR) to support internal power rails.


In each processor datasheet Technical Resources: Intel Core Processors there is a section called “electrical specifications" You can see average voltage ranges and specifications and understand how volts work on the CPU depending on different stages and based on Intel technology. Be aware that these ranges will depend on system requirements and those are average based on tests, not necessarily exact values.


You can check the following links for further information:


1. How to Find Maximum Voltage for Intel® Core™ Desktop Processor Operating Mode: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000092345/processors.html

2. What Is Clock Speed?: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/resources/cpu-clock-speed.html

3. Technical Specifications for Intel® Processors: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005736/processors.html


If you have any other questions, just let me know.


 

Regards,  

Deivid A. 

Intel Customer Support Technician 


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Jack170
Beginner
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Thank you for your time Deivid, I appreciate it. The datasheet is not very helpful, because it specifies only maximum operating vcore (VCC) voltage, not normal safe ranges. In practice no one will be running these chips at 1.72V (per max limits of datasheet) because it will quickly degrade the chip's capabilities. The "typical" column is there but empty.

My other question is in regards to memory controller. The datasheet specifies 1.2V limit for DDR4 but XMP is marketed as a memory overclock for Intel CPU's, and XMP profiles use higher voltages (1.35V for DDR4). Using the processor outside of its specified range voids warranty, does that mean XMP cannot be used?

 

Have a nice day,

 

Jack.

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DeividA_Intel
Employee
11,462 Views

Hello Jack170, 



Thanks for your response. You can use the Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (Intel® XMP) if you want to overclock the RAM or if you want better performance with an app/game. However, it is considered overclocking only if exceeds the supported memory speed for the CPU, in this case, DDR5 5600/DDR4 3200.


If the Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (Intel® XMP) profile does not exceed the speed mentioned (depending on if you use DDR4 or DDR5), your system should be fine and it should not void the warranty. I recommend checking with the motherboard manufacturer to confirm if it supports Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (Intel® XMP) and for any voltage recommendation for their system.



Regards,  

Deivid A.  

Intel Customer Support Technician  


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Jack170
Beginner
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Thank you again for your reply Deivid. If I may have one last question, would it be okay to run XMP (DDR4) at 1.25V instead of 1.35V from hardware safety perspective?

 

Have a nice day,

 

Jack.

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DeividA_Intel
Employee
11,383 Views

Hello Jack170, 



Thanks for your response. In this case, the BIOS usually provides 2 profiles with different speeds and you can choose the one that you like, depending on the RAM one of the speeds can exceed the supported CPU memory speed.


However, Intel does not recommend changing the default voltage values since this could damage the CPU and could be considered overclocking. If you would like to proceed I recommend you to check with the motherboard manufacturer for instructions.



Regards,  

Deivid A.  

Intel Customer Support Technician 


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Jack170
Beginner
11,342 Views

That makes no sense Deivid because by using the profile, it increases voltage to 1.35V. XMP runs at 1.35V. So which one is it then? Is XMP safe or not? Because you said it's safe but now you are saying that increasing voltages could damage the CPU and would void warranty.

 

Again XMP defaults to 1.35V from 1.2V. I was wondering if lowering it from 1.35V would be safe. You answered a completely different question and contradicted your previous statement.

 

Have a nice day,

 

Jack.

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Jean_Intel
Employee
11,314 Views

Hello Jack170,

 

Please note that using XMP is considered safe if you are setting the profiles under the processor specifications. Once you are over the processor specification, it can be considered overclocking and can cause system instability. Based on the specifications, the maximum memory speed for your processor is DDR4 3200 MT/s.

 

However, to confirm which voltage is considered safe, you should consult with the RAM manufacturer to check which voltage is supported by their product and confirm if it is considered safe to set the memory voltage to 1.35V.

 

Best regards,

Jean O. 

Intel Customer Support Technician


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n_scott_pearson
Super User
11,312 Views

Again, Jean has answered the different question - but no, there are no conflicts in what is being said this time... ;^)

XMP profiles come from the DIMMs/SODIMMs themselves. In this case, the XMP profile is saying that 1.35V is required to utilize this profile. Forcibly lowering the voltage while still using this profile is NOT recommended and, in fact, will likely result in memory errors and could result in memory bus hangs. Will this physically damage anything? Unlikely, but that's really not the point. Don't do it.

Hope this helps,

...S

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Jack170
Beginner
11,148 Views

I want to thank Jean and you for your time as well.

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