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Upcoming r200 camera - is it possible to plug it into a laptop (via USB3 port)?

Maxim_G_1
Beginner
296 Views

Hello!

On this page i can see some spec but i can't figure out how can i plug it into my laptop (or just to connect with my laptop). In a case of f200 i have no such questions but i'm really interested in r200 - does anybody know, is it possible?

Thanks in advance!

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10 Replies
MartyG
Honored Contributor III
296 Views

There is no reason why the R200 would not work with a laptop's USB 3 port, since the F200 camera does.  However, statistically people do seem to have more problems with the F200 camera if they are using a laptop.  This can sometimes be due to the laptop having under-powered USB ports that work with low-power devices but fail when high-drain activities like depth sensing with the camera laser kicks in.

Numerous people have found that their camera issues are fixed if, instead of plugging the camera directly into the computer, they plug it into an external powered USB hub (one that draws power from the mains instead of from the computer).  

The official Intel guidelines claim that the camera does not work with the camera, but this is not strictly the case - it is the type of hub that draws its juice from the computer's USB port that doesn't work.  A mains-powered hub has worked for people most of the time.

daflippers
Beginner
296 Views

Hi Marty,

8< the laptop having under-powered USB ports that work with low-power devices but fail when high-drain activities...

If this is the case then either the Laptop USB3 port or the camera are not complying with the USB specification on power.  I suspect it is more likely that there is an internal USB hub in the laptop.

David

Maxim_G_1
Beginner
296 Views

First of all - thank you for your answers, i appreciate it!

Getting back to R200 - as far as i know that camera designed to be embedded into devices (that's why we can't see how can we connect it with computer), but F200 can be connected with computer/laptop by using USB cable... So i need to be sure that i'll be able to connect it with current mobile devices via USB.

Also there is another thing i'm worry about - requirement - "Intel® Atom™ code name “Cherry Trail” processor ". Does it mean that i'll not be able to connect R200 to any mobile device with some old (for example, Bay Trail) processor?

Thanks! 

MartyG
Honored Contributor III
296 Views

David, as far as I'm aware, there is a minimum standard for USB port power levels but not for maximum power levels (please correct me if I'm wrong on this).  

This issue manifests especially with USB 3 internal expansion cards for PCs.  Some manufacturers provide a connector on their card to attach a 5V power supply connector from the PSU to the card to provide extra juice for high drain USB activities, whilst other card manufacturers do not provide this connector (presumably to save a few pennies) and so enable enough power to be drawn from the PCI-Express slot for low to average power devices but cannot provide enough power through the port for demanding applications.

One guy on this forum found that his PC's problems with the camera were fixed if he spliced an additional 5V connection into the camera cable, if I recall correctly.

Regarding the R200, Maxim: whilst the version of the R200 that is embedded into devices is a circuit board, the developer kit version seems to be built into an external casing like the F200 so developers can develop applications for it on their PC.  Here's what it looks like without the developer kit casing.

http://punto-informatico.it/punto/20140909/Schermata%202014-09-09%20alle%2008.54.21.jpeg

(BTW, Intel's CEO recently showed a forthcoming new version of the R200 that is much smaller and can fit in a smartphone casing.)

I would speculate that the external developer kit version uses a different circuit board that has a USB port on it whilst the circuit-board version likely does not have such a port because it would not need an external USB connection and be powered by some other internal connector. 

daflippers
Beginner
295 Views

Hi Marty,

Both source and sink currents are defined in the very, very detailed USB spec - see attached.

David

MartyG
Honored Contributor III
295 Views

Very interesting, David - thanks for the info!  The guy who spliced his cable detected that the camera's laser was drawing 600 mA when in the high-drain depth sensing mode.  That would seem to be well within the 900 mA max in the specification.

There is clear evidence that there is a relationship between USB power supply level and successful camera functioning (such as the camera working during high-drain modes once 5V had been added, and the camera not working sometimes in in-built USB ports but working with mains-powered USB hubs).   And I had greater success with a USB expansion card once I hooked up a 5V PSU cable to the card, after the high-drain camera samples wouldn't work when drawing from the PCI-Express slot alone without that supplementary juice.

It can't be ruled out though that there may be other factors at play in some machines, such as your suggestion of an internal USB hub.  Might be a good idea for Intel' and Creative's engineers to do some more investigation of this issue when they're working on the next motion camera (which likely won't be out this year as the current cam still has plenty of untapped potential that can be harnessed through software updates).

 

daflippers
Beginner
295 Views

The USB spec covers everything.  The main spec is 631 pages and there is a separate 534 page power delivery document and every possible power state is defined, inrush current, slew rates, short circuit current etc. hence my comments.  So if it is power related either the laptop or the camera is not fully compliant with the specification.

David

stefano_i_
Beginner
295 Views

I write from my recent personal experience with the R200 bought a few weeks ago. Using the R200 on the MacBook Pro i7 with BootCamp Win 10 Pro.

It works well, I had no problem with the USB3 connector original cable.

Certainly it is a little awkward, since the RealSense R200 has been developed for mobile devices such as a tablet, for example, to ensure easy handling and more stability of the scan.

Of course the main problem is finding a device equipped with hardware that can support the R200 at a resonable price. I'm seeing for Chuwi HI12 with Cherry Trail T5 8300 dual OS Win10 + Android, it should work.

Meanwhile I wanted to ask you : do you believe that using a no original USB3 cable and 2 meters long can affect the quality of the scan?

 

kfind1
New Contributor I
295 Views

"do you believe that using a no original USB3 cable and 2 meters long can affect the quality of the scan?"

No. I used a 1.5m USB3.0 cable recently without issue, and the USB3.0 spec allows for much longer. Tested with R200 and my laptop (which hardly matches any of the requirements for Realsense by the way, but still works for most things except those that need OpenCL1.2).

stefano_i_
Beginner
295 Views

In this way I could take advantage of the hardware of the laptop. Avoiding mobile devices
Thank you!

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