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Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
1,193 Views

tse ip core ,I have dataout on rgmii ,but I can't receive data by wireshark’

By using tse ip core ,I have dataout on rgmii ,through 88e1111 but I can't receive data by wireshark’ what problem may be?thank you!

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9 Replies
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

Hi yyb, take a look at this post, this was a big help for me getting my first packet to show up in wireshark. The USB to Ethernet adapter is key. Hope this helps...  

http://www.alteraforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=53220&p=218435#post218435 (http://www.alteraforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=53220&p=218435#post218435)
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

thank you!I have realize 100M eth by using this IP core . so i don't know why The USB to Ethernet adapter is key.should i write sdc file for my project ? or just use IP core's sdc file ? thanks for your attention

Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

 

--- Quote Start ---  

why The USB to Ethernet adapter is key. 

--- Quote End ---  

 

I'm using a windows system, and I don't have much experience with wireshark, or controlling Ethernet traffic through my machine. So I'm using a USB-Ethernet adapter to create a dedicated Ethernet interface on my laptop that is not being used by my PC for anything else. I found that using wireshark to capture on a dedicated Ethernet interface listening to only my FPGA was a big help in seeing the traffic being generated in the FPGA. You either get nothing or packets from your hardware. Once I had got the Ethernet header correct, wireshark helped me debug the rest of the packet. 

 

 

--- Quote Start ---  

should i write sdc file for my project ? or just use IP core's sdc file ? thanks for your attention 

--- Quote End ---  

 

There is an .sdc file provided by the IP, if you open the .qip file in a text editor you will see the path to your sdc. It's automatically included in the project if you added the .qip generated at the time you generated the TSE core for your FPGA.
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

 

--- Quote Start ---  

I'm using a windows system, and I don't have much experience with wireshark, or controlling Ethernet traffic through my machine. So I'm using a USB-Ethernet adapter to create a dedicated Ethernet interface on my laptop that is not being used by my PC for anything else. I found that using wireshark to capture on a dedicated Ethernet interface listening to only my FPGA was a big help in seeing the traffic being generated in the FPGA. You either get nothing or packets from your hardware. Once I had got the Ethernet header correct, wireshark helped me debug the rest of the packet. 

--- Quote End ---  

 

Sorry,when i debug my FPGA,i only use one ethernet interface that listening to my fpga.So what is the different between direct use of cable and USB-Ethernet adapter。Thank you!
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

 

--- Quote Start ---  

Sorry,when i debug my FPGA,i only use one ethernet interface that listening to my fpga.So what is the different between direct use of cable and USB-Ethernet adapter。Thank you! 

--- Quote End ---  

 

I guess I was recommending a way to separate the device under test from all other Ethernet traffic on your PC. I found that my laptop is generating traffic on the default NIC. Having the adapter helped me have an isolated ethernet interface that my CPU doesn't use for anything. So the only traffic I see is what I send out that port, and what comes back. But I'm a noob with wireshark, so this was a simple and inexpensive trick to help me get there. It sounds like this is not a solution to your problem. 

 

If the interface is not a problem and you know it's RGMII coming out, then you might look into your Ethernet headers to see if you are byte-ordering them correctly in the packet. If unsure, look at the way the Altera testbench inserts the mac address into the octet stream. At first I did not see anything in wireshark until I re-ordered the bytes. Also turn on 'promiscuous mode' in wireshark capture options if you haven't done this already. 

 

Otherwise please state the problem more clearly, what you've tried and what didn't work, how it looked in the simulation, etc. to get more refined answers.
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

 

--- Quote Start ---  

I guess I was recommending a way to separate the device under test from all other Ethernet traffic on your PC. I found that my laptop is generating traffic on the default NIC. Having the adapter helped me have an isolated ethernet interface that my CPU doesn't use for anything. So the only traffic I see is what I send out that port, and what comes back. But I'm a noob with wireshark, so this was a simple and inexpensive trick to help me get there. It sounds like this is not a solution to your problem. 

 

If the interface is not a problem and you know it's RGMII coming out, then you might look into your Ethernet headers to see if you are byte-ordering them correctly in the packet. If unsure, look at the way the Altera testbench inserts the mac address into the octet stream. At first I did not see anything in wireshark until I re-ordered the bytes. Also turn on 'promiscuous mode' in wireshark capture options if you haven't done this already. 

 

Otherwise please state the problem more clearly, what you've tried and what didn't work, how it looked in the simulation, etc. to get more refined answers. 

--- Quote End ---  

 

Thank you! I really sorry that my problem isn't stated clearly.My english is poor ,sometimes i don't know how to express is well.Your advice is helpful,i will try it.Thank you sincerely!:)
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

Sorry, I did not intend to pick on your English. I meant that you should provide more information about your problem to help a person understand what you're dealing with. Sometimes that's hard to do when you're learning. I'm also trying to learn on TSE MAC, so my answers might not be the greatest either :). Just sharing what has worked for me so far. Hope you found what you're looking for!

Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

Hello Everybody, 

I have been in a similar spot some time ago. 

I have a DE2-115 and i succeeded in sending UDP messages to my pc and showing them on Wireshark.  

 

I started from a DE2-115 tutorial for the TSE, is a good place to start and it comes with an SDC file so you can use this file. 

 

First thing to check is to see if your network connection is ok. This is a negotiation between the Nic on your PC or switch or router and the Ethernet chip on your DE. 

You can check the link by looking at the 1000 /100 /10 mb leds on the DE board, if they light up you have a working hardware connection. In this area on the DE there are also LEDs that indicate send and receive. 

 

If you send and Ethernet packet from the DE to the PC, and you use a switch or router, and the packet is not correctly formatted, the switch will discard the packet and your PC will receive nothing. 

 

So, you can leave out the switch and connect the DE directly to your PC. This way normally, badly formed packets also will be shown on Wireshark provided you select the right interface to monitor in Wireshark. 

 

To use Wireshark effectively the only thing you have to do is select the right Ethernet interface and start it, all frames will show themselves on the screen. But as another respondent to this thread correctly stated, you need to enable promiscuous mode so all traffic, even traffic that does not destined to your PC (messages that do not have the MAC destination == your PC Nic MAC and are not special broadcast messages) are passed through. 

 

Remark: once you can format messages properly (UDP / IP …) you can send messages from your DE and back and monitor traffic with a third PC if you have a Managed Switch. 

Managed Switches have the option to send all traffic that goes from port A (DE) to port B (e.g. printer) also to port C (mirrored port). If you connect a Wireshark PC to port C you will see all traffic from A to B. With an unmanaged/or managed switch that is not correctly configured you will not see traffic from A to B if you are connected to port C. 

 

Best Regards, 

Johi.
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
49 Views

Hello Everybody, 

I have been in a similar spot some time ago. 

I have a DE2-115 and i succeeded in sending UDP messages to my pc and showing them on Wireshark.  

 

I started from a DE2-115 tutorial for the TSE, is a good place to start and it comes with an SDC file so you can use this file. 

 

First thing to check is to see if your network connection is ok. This is a negotiation between the Nic on your PC or switch or router and the Ethernet chip on your DE. 

You can check the link by looking at the 1000 /100 /10 mb leds on the DE board, if they light up you have a working hardware connection. In this area on the DE there are also LEDs that indicate send and receive. 

 

If you send and Ethernet packet from the DE to the PC, and you use a switch or router, and the packet is not correctly formatted, the switch will discard the packet and your PC will receive nothing. 

 

So, you can leave out the switch and connect the DE directly to your PC. This way normally, badly formed packets also will be shown on Wireshark provided you select the right interface to monitor in Wireshark. 

 

To use Wireshark effectively the only thing you have to do is select the right Ethernet interface and start it, all frames will show themselves on the screen. But as another respondent to this thread correctly stated, you need to enable promiscuous mode so all traffic, even traffic that does not destined to your PC (messages that do not have the MAC destination == your PC Nic MAC and are not special broadcast messages) are passed through. 

 

Remark: once you can format messages properly (UDP / IP …) you can send messages from your DE and back and monitor traffic with a third PC if you have a Managed Switch. 

Managed Switches have the option to send all traffic that goes from port A (DE) to port B (e.g. printer) also to port C (mirrored port). If you connect a Wireshark PC to port C you will see all traffic from A to B. With an unmanaged/or managed switch that is not correctly configured you will not see traffic from A to B if you are connected to port C. 

 

Best Regards, 

Johi.
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