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How to use "ipmwatch" with PMEM200 and 3rd Gen Xeon?

csfrogy
Beginner
824 Views

Hi, I just read from some papers that "ipmwatch" utility can be used to measure the read/write to Optane DCPMM. 

My device uses PMEM200 (2nd Gen Optane DCPMM) and 3rd Gen Xeon processor (Xeon Gold 6348 CPU).

When I download and install ipmwatch with YUM and use it, the message shows that "Intel Optane DIMMS are not available on this system."

When I download and install ipmwatch with code in intel/intel-pmwatch (github.com)   , the message shows that "Unsupported firmware."

Does "ipmwatch" support PMEM200 (2nd Gen Optane DCPMM) ?

And how could I use "ipmwatch" utility in my device? 

Many thanks for the help.

 

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1 Solution
SteveScargall
Employee
804 Views

Hi csfrogy,

 

ipmwatch was written for Optane 100 PMem and hasn't been updated to support Optane 200. You should use the open-source PCM tool (pcm-memory) to view bandwidth and near-memory miss (Memory Mode).  

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5 Replies
SteveScargall
Employee
805 Views

Hi csfrogy,

 

ipmwatch was written for Optane 100 PMem and hasn't been updated to support Optane 200. You should use the open-source PCM tool (pcm-memory) to view bandwidth and near-memory miss (Memory Mode).  

csfrogy
Beginner
790 Views

Hi SteveScargall, 

Thank you for offering your valuable advice and information.

csfrogy
Beginner
751 Views

Hi SteveScargall,

another question: 

Since the ipmwatch doesn't support Optane 200 and the PCM tool can only view bandwidth, how can I view the relationship between  media read/write(operations performed to the physical media) and the cpu read/write.

(I want to measure read/write amplification to physical media)

Many thanks for the help.

SteveScargall
Employee
732 Views

If you or your company has an NDA with Intel, you can reach out through your Intel contact to request a tool that will collect the information. 

 

Alternatively, you can collect the performance data from the PMem modules using `ipmctl show -performance`:

# ipmctl show -performance
---DimmID=0x0001---
   MediaReads=0x00000000000000000000001570eb5eac
   MediaWrites=0x000000000000000000000012b723daac
   ReadRequests=0x000000000000000000000000049aab6b
   WriteRequests=0x0000000000000000000000000c7760af
   TotalMediaReads=0x000000000000000000001204fbe362f0
   TotalMediaWrites=0x0000000000000000000003ca773987fc
   TotalReadRequests=0x00000000000000000000016c58c6d361
   TotalWriteRequests=0x0000000000000000000000abb03f3bfc
---DimmID=0x0011---
[...snip...]

This approach isn't intended for frequent probing (ie: 1second), but you could write a shell script that will collect the data every 5seconds or more, then process the data into CSV or similar data that you could then graph if required.

grayxu
Novice
191 Views

Confused about why

This approach isn't intended for frequent probing (ie: 1second)

 


As far as I know, PMWatch is dependent on libipmctl, don't they use same API or something? Are there any performance problems here? 

Thanks!

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