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z790 ddr5 SUPPORT

timetraveler
Beginner
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what is memory overclock ?  Z790 support up to (5600 MT/s). 

 

MSI motherboard support (OC)/6800(OC)/6600(OC)/6400(OC)/6200(OC)/6000(OC)/5800(OC)/5600(JEDEC)

 

can i install DDR5 6000 memory on Z790 board ?

 

 

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n_scott_pearson
Super User
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The memory controllers are in your processor, not the chipset, and thus memory overclocking has absolutely nothing to do with it.

Whether a particular (and individual) processor-motherboard-memory combination is going to work is dependent upon these individual components. Since you haven't mentioned what processor you are attempting or considering to use, I can't comment any further in this respect. I would mention, however, that there are three modes of failure that can exist in a situation like this, (a) combination simply doesn't work at all, (b) works but not at the full speed of the memory (i.e., this 6000 memory is run at 5600, for example) and (c) works for a while (combination fails as the components age).

...S

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timetraveler
Beginner
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I intend to use 13700K .    Then how does the memory overclock work?  inside the process, chipset or bord?  or memory ?

 

as indicated on motherboard spec,  (OC)/6800(OC)/6600(OC)/6400(OC)/6200(OC)/6000(OC)/5800(OC)/5600(JEDEC).  

 

If install a 6000 memory, will run at 5600 ?

 

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n_scott_pearson
Super User
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Memory overclocking is happening within the processor's memory controllers, which control the speed of the memory buses. Over a separate bus (a System Management Bus (SMBus)), the XMP profiles are read from the memory DIMMs. The motherboard's BIOS will attempt to initialize the memory buses at its highest XMP setting (which would be 6000 in your case). If it hangs the system as a result, a watchdog timer will reset the system and the BIOS will respond by backing off to a lower XMP setting (if one exists) and try again. If all XMP settings are exhausted, it will attempt to run at the lowest (default) settings. If this too fails, the BIOS will stop, provide an error indication (typically via flashing of power LED) and the system will be powered back off.

[Aside: this happens every time the BIOS goes through POST (Power-On Self-Test). What's really neat is that it can go through these timeout-retry operations so fast that it might just feel like the BIOS is being a little slow  getting through POST. In fact, initializing the USB buses can take way longer!] 

At whatever is the highest (XMP or otherwise) setting that seemed to work, the system will continue through POST and, unless an error occurs in some other subsystem, into the boot phase. A subsequent failure may still occur if the stability of the overall memory solution is poor, and this will typically result in an unexpected system hang. Unfortunately, since system hangs can be caused by many other things, it can be difficult to diagnose these situations - and this is what can happen over time as the system and its components age (we're talking many months or even years here, typically not anything shorter). At the same time, you could even see memory value errors occurring.

Here's a quick backgrounder: The thing that causes the system to fail is as a result of electrical noise. This is akin to background sounds drowning out someone talking. When the sounds gets intense (loud) enough, you can't make out what the person is saying. In this case, all components in a system, right down to the individual resistors and capacitors, make some amount of electrical noise. As they age, these components produce more of this noise. As the memory buses are asked to run at higher and higher speeds, they also become more susceptible to this noise. When the noise on the memory buses reaches the point where the memory bus controllers in the processor and/or the individual memory DIMMs cannot differentiate the ones and zeros from each other, communication will stop; the buses will hang. Now, the motherboard implements various capabilities in its design to dampen noise as much as possible (and also handle things like signal reflections occurring on the buses). Good quality motherboards do a better job than cheap, at both minimizing noise and dampening noise.

Bottom line, the processor, the motherboard, the motherboard's BIOS and the memory DIMMs themselves are all involved in memory operation and memory overclocking. Now, I would be negligent if I didn't point out that overclocking also has other affects on the processor. Running the memory buses at levels higher than designed can cause problems just like the overclocking of processor cores, namely the individual silicon gates are asked to switch at faster speeds and this can result in additional heat being produced. Take this too far and the lifetime of the processor silicon and the operation of these gates can deteriorate.

Does this cover everything or does it just generate more questions?

...S

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timetraveler
Beginner
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I have some more questions.

 

13th gen processor spec read Up to DDR5 5600 MT/s.   

motherboard spec read (OC)/6800(OC)/6600(OC)/6400(OC)/6200(OC)/6000(OC)/5800(OC)/5600(JEDEC)

 

6000(OC) is overclock speed through XMP ?    so, the default speed would at maximus speed 5600?     what will happen if I install 6000 memory?  will make is no stable or 6000 memory will still run at 5600 maximum speed?  

 

 

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n_scott_pearson
Super User
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Intel specs list the highest speed that they regularly validate and thus will guarantee. This does not mean that they cannot be run at higher speeds, just that it may not work and is not guaranteed to do so.

Correct, 6000 is considered an overclocked speed and is (typically) made available through XMP profiles.

Default speed is determined by BIOS implementation. It may follow processor - or maybe not; technically, 4800 is the default speed for DDR5.

If you install 6000 memory and the motherboard tests and finds that this seems to work, then it will run at 6000. Otherwise it will back off to slower speed that seems to work.

Not necessarily. As I said above, it might drop all the way down to 4800 as this is the DDR5 default.

Hope this helps,

...S

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