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Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
778 Views

How to disable I/O Bank Source Voltage

Hi,  

Im working with a D0-Nano Board / Cyclone IV . While i was making some measurement, i conected by a mistake in shortcircuit a GPIO output with 12v from a Voltage Source. That pin was bronken, i couldnt get any signal from it. So i started to find out what to do with this issue.  

I ve got about 144 GPIO so having one out of service is not a problem. But after this damage, every time i conect the board to a voltage source, its temperature start to rise high, its sinking a lot of current. 

With a multimeter i started to test continuity between GND and the pins, (all pins in normal state are at 3.3v) , and i Checked out that the damaged pin (GPIO_019 - PIND8) is biased to GND, " in short circuit " so that's why mi board is sinking more current than it usually did. 

So, something on the chip was broken, so i've been looking for how to disable the block that this pins belong, to avoid this excess of current. But I couldnt find a setting that allows me to do that on Pin Planner.  

Every time a conect the board, this one execute the synthesis, the firmware works, but the damaged pins sinks a lot of current so the chips temperature rise very high. 

 

Any idea to solve this?? because at this moment the board is useless..... 

 

best regards. 

 

 

Links, i Cheked: 

 

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/41591/specify-exact-pin-locations-on-fpga 

 

https://db-electronics.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/an-an258.pdf 

 

Cyclone IV Device Handbook, Volume 1, Section II.I/O Interfaces. I/O Banks.
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2 Replies
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
41 Views

I doubt the FPGA is salvageable after an incident like this. You may be able to recover the board by having the FPGA swapped, but that would be much more expensive than just buying a new board. It's "only" $79 after all. 

 

Live and learn - we've all been there before (at least most of us old farts).
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
41 Views

 

--- Quote Start ---  

I doubt the FPGA is salvageable after an incident like this. You may be able to recover the board by having the FPGA swapped, but that would be much more expensive than just buying a new board. It's "only" $79 after all. 

 

Live and learn - we've all been there before (at least most of us old farts). 

--- Quote End ---  

 

 

Thaks! for answering.  

 

Yeah its cheaper buying another kit. But, i thought, that maybe, if a could disable some source voltage of that pin's bank, avoid the shortcut to GND , and keep using the FPGA with the others GPIO. 

 

In my country (Argentina) i have to import the kit and that take some days, and i have many extras taxes to pay for it.
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