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JPsyk
Beginner
618 Views

I have accidentaly turned 1TB disk into recovery read-only partition

I don't know how to revert that change, i can't create a new volume from unallocated space on disk, i also can't remove the recovery volume IRST created because i can't acces raid bios on my Aspire A715-72G, the secure boot in bios is greyed out so i can't cange to legacy bios mode.

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3 Replies
David_V_Intel
Employee
71 Views

Hello JPsyk, Thank you for posting on the Intel ® communities. Any data in the recovery volume will be erased when trying to change it back to non-recovery. If you are OK with that, please follow these steps: A. Using the Intel® Rapid Storage Technology User Interface Utility 1.Run the Intel® Rapid Storage Technology UI from the following Start menu link: Start -> All Programs -> Intel® Rapid Storage Technology -> Intel® Rapid Storage Technology UI 2.Under ‘Status’ or ‘Manage’, click on the volume you want to delete. You will be presented with the volume properties on the left. 3.Click on ‘Delete volume’ 4.Review the warning message and click ‘Yes’ to delete the volume. 5.The ‘Status’ page refreshes and displays the resulting available space in the storage system view. B. Using the Option ROM User Interface (You may need to get in contact with the system manufacturer in order to properly access the RAID BIOS extension) 1.During POST, use CTRL-I to enter the RST BIOS Extension. 2.Mark the drive as "Non-RAID". 3.Reboot your system. I hope this helps. Regards, David V Intel Customer Support Technician Under Contract to Intel Corporation
David_V_Intel
Employee
71 Views

Hello JPsyk, Were you able to check the steps I recommended? Let me know if you need any more assistance. Regards, David V Intel Customer Support Technician Under Contract to Intel Corporation
rsmit48
Beginner
71 Views

Service host Superfetch is a Windows service that is intended to make your applications launch faster and improve your system respond speed. It does so by pre-loading programs you frequently use into RAM so that they don't have to be called from the hard drive every time you run them.

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