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Convert CVF 6.6C to run on 64 bit machine

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
2,753 Views

Hi everybody,

BearofLittleBrain is back - for some reason I had to have BearofLittleBrain1 instead of my old handle of BearofLittleBrain.  The system must remember me, although I didn't manage to sign in using that name - expired password, I expect..  May I have my old handle back please?

The reason for posting is that I was using CVF6.6C on Windows 7 - actually it was CVF6.6 1,2 or 3 ( I can't remember which: I do remember that one of them gave me grief, so I switch to another) and retired in 2003.  I carried on using it on a 32-bit machine which suddenly kicked the bucket.  However, I had managed to save all my data and I had the discs, but my next machine was 64-bit and wouldn't accept CVF6.6C.  So, using XPMode, I was able to carry on, but found it to be such a pain that I gave up.

Recently, my local Astronomical club asked me to calculate some orbits, but I was a bit stuffed.  CVF6.6C is what I knew and was quite adequate for my needs, so what I was wondering was whether any of you can help me convert CVF6.6C to run on a 64-bit machine?  I have searched online quite a lot, including on this forum, but haven't found the answer.

Bearing in mind that I am 82 and my handle does accurately describe me, replies should not be couched in too technical terms.  I should think that the person who is most likely to be able to assist is Steve Lionel.  Hi, Steve if you are reading this - help please.  Which reminds me that in the past, members of this forum used to reply to Bear, thinking it might be rude to use my full handle.  It's not - I work on the premise that you only insult your friends.

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1 Solution
BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,799 Views

Sorry everybody for not noticing Steve's observation - I suppose that at the time I thought that trying to keep CVF was the best way forward.  Now I realise that I was on a hiding to nothing if I did that and suddenly the costs of IVF and Visual Studio are free.  All that it will cost is for windows 10 Pr - what's not to like?

Apologies again for wasting ereyone's time, but I learnt a lot about what to do.

I think that that ends this thread successfully.

BearofLittleBrain

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36 Replies
mecej4
Black Belt
1,851 Views

I have a copy of CVF 6.6C on my Windows 10-64 PC, and it runs fine (even though I don't have "XP-Mode"), but I do not use CVF much. 

If your code uses standard Fortran, you should not need much "conversion", if any. If you can zip up your source files and post the Zip file here or on a cloud server, one of us may try building it using OneAPI.

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,826 Views

Black Belt,

Many thanks for you prompt reply - you must have been burning the midnight oil!

If I have got you right, you are talking of converting files produced by CVF6.6C - that's not what I want.  I want to convert my CVF6.6A, CVF6.6C upgrade and Compaq Array Visualiser discs (I have them and the licence number) to 64-bit versions that will run on my 64-bit PC.  I am unsure of whether it was CVF6.6C1, 2,or 3, so might need all three to try .  These should all be available from Intel's archives.   I also have a licenced copy of Intel Visual Fortran 9.0 that I never managed to  install; because it is dated 2006 and doesn't mention 64-bits in the meagre instructions, I assume it is also 32-bit, so woullike to convert that too.  BTW, although my PC is 10 years old, it has bags of SSD and would now produce in a few seconds the results from my magnum opus, which was a 60,000-line program.  Using previous works computers, it used to be as much as an overnight job.  My 60th anniversary of writing a Fortran program is coming up on 7 October, so this will be a birthday present to myself.

This is not to you, but to the Intel Fortran Forum administrators:  Please may I have my old handle of BearofLittleBrain back, plus what I hope will get attached - an icon of Pooh, who is the bear of my handle.  I'm not really a new user - I have been here many times before.  BTW, I also used to sign in as "llynisa" but that doesn't work either.

Now here's something to amuse you all in a coffee break at the desk:

Llyn Isa is the name of my house, and as far as I know, is unique in the United Kingdom.  I went to the same college as Christopher Robin Milne, who had Pooh as a toy.  My wife and I may also be unique in that I went to the same college as Newton, and my wife went to the same college as Einstein in Aarau.  The questions are: 1. What are the Christopher Robin books?;  2. What are the names of the colleges?. 

Answers on a postcard, please - literally - I won't get them unless you find out my address - it would be great to hear from old and new friends.  Don't spoil it by posting the answers here or elswhere online.  Good hunting!

mecej4
Black Belt
1,818 Views

Re "If I have got you right, you are talking of converting files produced by CVF6.6C": No, I meant converting your source code to make it compilable by a modern compiler, be it 32-bit or 64-bit. Depending on the amount of non-standard Fortran features that you use in your program, that work may range from trivial to practically impossible.

Re "I want to convert my CVF6.6A, CVF6.6C upgrade and Compaq Array Visualiser discs (I have them and the licence numbers) to 64-bit versions that will run on my 64-bit PC. " : You do not need to attempt the impossible (producing 64-bit EXEs and LIBs of the CVF compiler). The 32-bit components of CVF work fine on Windows 10-64-bit, as I stated already. There is one roadblock to installing from the CVF 6.6 CD, which is that the default installer is 16-bit, and that will not run on Windows 10. 

I don't think that it is worthwhile to spend more than a few minutes of time attempting to install CVF on a modern PC. If you succeed, fine, use it; if not, move on to a modern compiler, or find an old 32-bit PC (or a 32-bit Windows Virtual Machine) and install CVF on it.

Steve_Lionel
Black Belt Retired Employee
1,791 Views

I have little to add to @mecej4 's excellent advice. As noted, the default installer is 16-bit and won't run, but you can run X86\SETUP.EXE and that will work. Visual Studio 6 needs to be run "As Administrator" on Windows Vista and later. 

That said, there is really no good reason to keep using CVF, especially now that Intel Fortran and current Visual Studio are free. You did mention Array Visualizer, for which there is no replacement - if you really need that then you'll have to stick with CVF.

jimdempseyatthecove
Black Belt
1,765 Views

The (old) Array Visualizer (.mod, .lib, .dll) works from within the application (but MS VS integration does not). At least the 32/64-bit files from IVF V8, ... untl last redistributables.

Jim Dempsey

Steve_Lionel
Black Belt Retired Employee
1,741 Views

Some early versions of Intel Visual Fortran supported Array Visualizer (not in VS, though. That was dropped when the lead developer of AV left Intel.

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,701 Views

Many thank to you, mecej4, Jim Dempsey and Steve Lionel- I think we are there.

My 64-bit  PC has Windows 7 Pro; asking for Array Visualiser was really just in case - I used it in the last century, but found it better to write my own specialised graphical displays from about 1990 onwards.  I am not wedded to CVF if IVF and Visual Studio are free - I thought it would cost me more than $1,000 for IVF alone.

What version of IVF is it that is free and how do I get it?  I am not bothered so long as there are no particular difficulties in installing  and running it.

I imagine that one part of migrating to IVF will be changing "df" to "if" in the settings.  What else am I likely to encounter?  On this score, I extensively extended a Fortran 77 to Fortran 90 converter originally written by someone else so that the output was just what I wanted.  The output required very little editing to complete the conversion.  So I imagine that something similar might be worthwhile contemplating.  If the 77 to 90 converter is of interest, I will revisit it when I get IVF working: it is accompanied by a fairly comprehensive guide and could be made available to anyone.  The same goes for the CVF Fortran 90 to Fortran ? that I might write.  What version of Fortran do you use now?  If it is different from 90, what's a good reference book?

If I am a little tardy in responding, it is because I have just been ordered to stop playing around on my computer and do something useful.  Also, thanks to whoever for changing me back to my old handle, BearofLittleBrain - I haven't checked on my icon yet.  But please stop awarding me badges for this and that - I find this false bonhomie just irritating.  Also I must apologise fror unnecessarily cluttering up my posts with ramblings - I will put them in attachments in future.

BearofLittleBrain

mecej4
Black Belt
1,673 Views

The OneAPI Fortran compilers will most probably not be possible to install and use on Windows 7, nor Windows 8.x. You will need a 64-bit version of Windows 10 to use the current Intel Fortran Classic compiler, and a recent version of Microsoft Visual Studio (Community or higher tier). Please see the requirements page for details.

If you determine that you have to stick with Windows 7 on your 10 years old PC, installing and running the old Intel Fortran 9.0 compiler may be an option. That version of the compiler was certainly capable of producing 64-bit code. Verify that your Windows-7 is a 64-bit version!

The software that runs this forum was changed a couple of years ago. Whether or not we like some of its features such as the badges, titles, etc., most of us have had our says, and we now follow the policy of "Grin-N-Bear-IT". 

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,648 Views

mecej4,

Many thanks for that.  Now I like my Windows 7 Professional  OS 6.1.7601 - Windows 7, SP1, System Type 64-bit OS.  It has seemed to me that from experience of Windows XP and talking to people, that Windows was becoming more nannying with eash succesive version, more retrictive of tinkering with the innards, etc.  Of course, Win 7 is otherwise an improvement on XP.  So I don't wnt to head on down to Win 10, for example, because several users actually said that it was too touchy-feely especially for Fortran number-crunching, and that it seemed to be heading to be an iPad-type of beast.

So, because my Win7 is 64-bit and I have the Intel Fortran 9.0 disc and licence, I would like to try to go that way: although old, I guess that it is less different to CVF than its successors; it will therefore be easier for me to transition.  I haven't tried to do anything yet - what are the steps in carrying it out, please?

On the forum, I think it is well superior to what it was and I didn't even make any errors in making my posts - on the previous one, I had a bit of a learnnig curve.  All that is wrong is the blasted badges, which of course is trivial and I haven't opened any of them.

Things are looking up!

BearofLittleBrain

mecej4
Black Belt
1,632 Views

Your Intel Fortran 9.0 CD/DVD probably has some HTML files that provide details of prerequisites and installation steps. These are old files, and are often impossible to find on the Web. 

Unless you also have a CD and license for Visual Studio 200X (I am not sure about the version, check in the HTML files on the IFort 9 DVD), you may not be able to perform a complete installation. This product (Visual Studio 200X), too, is so old that you cannot download an installer from the Web.

Sorry, I cannot help much with these old packages since I no longer have access to them.

JNichols
New Contributor I
1,615 Views

I have several legal copies of old VS installers, I never throw them away.  

If you send me a physical address by email (above) I will mail you one of the DVD's.  

 

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,466 Views

JNicols,

Many thanks for your generous offer on 31 August: in view of my download below, do I still need a disc from you?

I have now downloaded from https://archive.org/details/en_vs.net_pro_full the Windows executable of Visual Studio.NET 2002 Professional Edition: en_vs.net_pro_full.exe - 1.67 GB,  but am left unsure whether it contains Visual C++ 2002 (7.0), which is said to be needed.  Is the next step to install the executable?

I have now ported the release notes to Word 2003 and attached the .docx file: I am relieved to see it accepted.

jimdempseyatthecove
Black Belt
1,578 Views

One (of several) potential problems in conv erting from 32-bit to 64-bit to watch out for is INTEGER is 32-bit but HANDLE is 64-bit (verses 32-bit on 32-bit system). Too many old 32-bit programs intermixed use of INTEGE&HANDLE, or DWORD&HANDLE. Sometimes this (error) was found in the interface and would not show up with "interface checking" enabled. If you do "crash" on calls to Windows functions, investigate the bitness of the arguments.

Jim Dempsey

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,565 Views

Fellow archeologists,

Thanks for all your help - I think you have guided me to the solution of installing IVF9.0 on my 64-bit PC.

Firstly, thanks, meej4, after wrestling an .htm file into html so that the forum accepts it, I attach the release notes, which lead to the answer.  Well I tried, and although the file is now apparently .html, it is treated as .htm.  Bother.  Sorry - I had it converted online, or so I thought it was OK.  Can anyone help please? - I can't give you the .htm file to convert because it won't be accepted.  However, tomorrow I will try again by copy the whoel file into a word or .pdf doc.

My notes on thevital files are:

Windows 7 Professional  OS 6.1.7601 - Windows 7, SP1, System Type 64-bit OS

 Integrating Visual Studio c++ into Microsoft Visual Studion.NET is at https://docs.oracle.com/database/121/LNPCC/pc_ahintegrat.htm#LNPCC5130

Download Visual Studio .NET 2002 Professional Edition at https://archive.org/details/en_vs.net_pro_full

C++ 2002 (7.0) at http//www at .visualstudio.net seems to have VS files as well.

Visual Studio .NET 2002 Service Pack 1 GDIPLUS.DLL Security Update at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5547

A complete mess, although it is OK in a word .docx- apologies again.  I must rush before they lockthe doors on the old peoples' home.  A last quick attacment - 320 controls on it, part of Gtraj - any of you work on or in it?

 

 

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,511 Views

Jim Dempsey and other helpers,
Many thanks for that and previous help - I am going to put together a document with the collected wisdom of you all.
I found a Fortran77 to Fortran90 converter program written by quite an eminent Fortran expert Michael Metcalfe, CERN - the program used a command box, was rather limited in scope and the output needed a lot of editing. I built on that (standing on the shoulders of giants!) and produced a program written in Fortran 90 that I called convf77tof90 - plus a user guide. The output from this needed very little editing, although I will admit that it was in the idiosyncratic style that I liked.  I have just dug out the user guide from 2003 and it brings back memories. I attach it for interest.

I would hope to use it as a basis for convf90tof2003 - I believe that Fortran 2003 was what IVF9.0 used and is now still used by IVF2021.  It will be one of the first progams I will write when getting IVF9.0 running. But that's a long way away.

I will soon start a new thread on what reference books I have and what I will need.

TBW, the thing that really bugs me about browsing from applications is the keyhole size of the browsing window. Long ago I developed an automatically-resizing browsing window - I am very surprised that I have never come across anyone else's by now. I will look at it and see if it is working still and send you the code if you want it for general release when it has been sanitised.  I more probably can find a working .exe - I did, but it doesn't resize - it used to do so a year or two ago - perhaps only in XPMode at present.  Bother.

A thought for the future - QuickWin conversion - I would dearly love to convert everything to Windows, especially Scigraph, which I use extensively but means the programs must be QuickWin.  I failed to convert Scigraph despite a number of attempts.  Did anyone else convert it?
Regards
Alan

Steve_Lionel
Black Belt Retired Employee
1,489 Views

You do not need to convert F77 to F90 (or F2003). Current Intel Fortran will accept your F77 code just fine.

There are other plotting libraries with Fortran interfaces, for example, PGPLOT Graphics Subroutine Library (caltech.edu)  I would not focus on trying to port Scigraph.

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,477 Views

Steve,

Many thanks for saving me a lot of work on converting f90: I will look up PGPlot Graphics.  Unfortunately I have tweaked Scigraph for my specialist tasks - I will have to see.  What is the situation with QuickWin - does it work?

I have now downloaded from https://archive.org/details/en_vs.net_pro_full the Windows executable of Visual Studio.NET 2002 Professional Edition: en_vs.net_pro_full.exe - 1.67 GB,  but am left unsure whether it contains Visual C++ 2002 (7.0), which is said to be needed.  Is the next step to install the executable?

Bear of Little Brain. 

Steve_Lionel
Black Belt Retired Employee
1,450 Views

QuickWin still works, though is still limited to static linking into an executable.

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,397 Views

Steve,

That's good t know in the short term, but on translating QuickWin functions to Windows equivalents, is there a list of equivalents? I'd like to get rid of all Quickwin.
Thinking about your remarks on F77, F90 & F2003 all working, I think I will produce all new work in F90, If only becuse my converter from F77 gets rid of virtually all labels.
Regards,
Bear of Little Brain

BearofLittleBrain1
New Contributor I
1,319 Views

Steve, your latest post, which aboveiis timed at 09-02-2021  10:56PM is not appearing.  I have seen it, but can't now find it.  You said that I should standardise on Fortran 2018.  I have been so out of touch that I didn't even know it existed.  Can you recomment suitable refernce books please:  for Fortran 90/95 I have:

"Fortran 95 Handbook  Complete ISO/ANSI Reference" by Jeanne C Adams et al.

"Fortran 90/95 explained" by Michael Metcalf and John Reid.

Any suggestions woul be welcome, please.

Bear of Little Brain

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