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Beginner
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Help - 2 Hades Canyons wont switch on

I've got a Hades Canyon that won't turn on. This is the second one. The first one had the same problem and was returned. Both worked fine for 7-8 days prior to dying.

 

Spec is Hades Canyon (NUC8i7HNK3) with 1TB Samsung 970 Evo Plus and 2TB Samsung 970 Evo, and 2x 16GB RAM. 2 Displayport connected Dell 4k monitors. USB keyboard, mouse, webcam plus powered Creative speakers. Windows 10 latest download.

 

With both units, they do not respond to the power button at all. There is power from the power supply to the unit (tested the plug to the unit with a multimeter). But there is no response to trying to power on whatsoever. Press, press and hold, etc - nothing. When I plug the power cord into the unit, there is a white light that flashes once very briefly on the front indicating some power is getting to the NUC.

 

I think this happened after putting the units into Sleep mode (I'm a bit vague on this as the units just decided to stop responding to the power button so I was rather distracted).

 

Both times, the units would not even attempt to boot, nor could I enter the BIOS menu. First time round I removed all SSDs and memory and even then there was still no response at all from the unit. Basically totally dead.

 

Any ideas? The 2nd unit is being returned for replacement (3rd time lucky!). I'm concerned it might be part of my setup, but there's nothing unusual there at all - it's all very vanilla. I want to ensure the 3rd try works for longer than a few days!

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Super User
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Have you updated the bios on these units?

 

Windows 10, version 1809?

 

Doc

 

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)
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Beginner
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Thanks for the suggestion.

 

I haven’t - they are brand new so I assumed that they would be good to go.

 

Do you think this would cause this problem, where they work perfectly for some days and then just spontaneously brick themselves? Or would old BIOS simply result in the units not working at all?

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New Contributor I
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Try disconnecting the CMOS battery for a few minutes.

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Beginner
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That’s a good idea - I’ll give it a go...

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Beginner
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OK - they mystery deepens. Disconnecting the CMOS battery got me to BIOS with no SSDs installed, and after some BIOS checksum and date warnings.

 

Putting the SSDs back in resulted in the machine hanging again and not getting to BIOS startup or BIOS being accessible.

 

I removed the 1TB Samsung 970 Evo Plus SSD (the Windows boot drive) and I could now get to BIOS again. So it looks like an issue with the SSD. I took the SSD out, put it in a caddy and connected it to a laptop. The laptop briefly recognised the drive but wouldn’t read from it. So I suspect it is a problem with the SSD. Next...to remove the 1TB SSD boot from a USB and see if that works.

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Beginner
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Right, so it boots from USB (into AOMEI Partition Assistant), so it looks like I may have a dead SSD, which is extremely annoying. Now to work out how to fix the SSD.....

 

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New Contributor I
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Install everything including the SSD and then disconnect the CMOS battery for a minute or so and then retry powering up. With me every time I disconnected the PSU it wouldn’t restart without a CMOS reset. If it then won’t POST then the SSD is most likely deceased.

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Beginner
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And...installing the potentially faulty SSD into the NUC again causes the NUC to brick and not start to BIOS or boot from USB or anything. This time I disconnected the CMOS battery, but it still won’t boot even with both SSDs out. I’ll leave it overnight.

 

Weird.

 

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Beginner
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Thanks RPete12 I will give that a go in the morning. But the fact that the SSD won’t work in a caddy attached to my laptop indicates death as you say.

 

I wonder if the NUC killed the SSD. It was working OK. Or did the SSD kill the NUC?

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Super User
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Or, the NUC is ok (and did not kill anything), and the SSD may have just gone bad (on its own). Looking for anything beyond that is a stretch.

 

Doc

 

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)
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Super User Retired Employee
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There are a couple of other conversations here in the forums where the problem was traced to bad Samsung M.2 SSDs. Bad ones do slip through their validation processes (I don't believe that they test every single unit)...

 

...S

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Beginner
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Strange - after leaving the NUC powered off with the CMOS battery removed overnight, I plugged it in this morning (no SSDs installed) and it wont get to BIOS again and won’t respond to the power button. The plot thickens.

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Beginner
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Further to this - it seems that even if the power cord is disconnected and the CMOS battery disconnected, the NUC still can get power from some other connection (displayport?).

 

Before I went to work, I completely disconnected every cable from the NUC, disconnected the battery, and left it until I returned. When I got back, I was able to turn the unit on and get into BIOS. I’ve also been able to create a Windows boot drive on USB which also works nicely.

 

So my conclusion is that the Samsung 970 Evo Plus SSD is indeed the cause of the problem.

 

Amazon have agreed to do an immediate replacement of the SSD and I’ll return the dead one. Then I have to get everything set up once again which is a real drag. I’ll hold off replacing the NUC for the moment.

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Super User
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You have already replaced the nuc twice. And, from this discussion, there is nothing to indicate that the nuc(s) were bad.

 

Equipment goes bad. As you have diagnosed, the SSD is bad. Just replace it, and reinstall the OS.

 

Doc

 

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)
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Beginner
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Indeed. However the NUC is now playing up without the SSD anywhere near it and NOT switching on. So I’m getting both of them replaced to be on the safe side.

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Super User Retired Employee
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That's not a sign of a problem; that's a configuration setting in the BIOS. By default, if you provide the NUC with power, it will attempt to power up. If you do not want this, you can go into BIOS Setup (the Visual BIOS program) and change the setting. In Visual BIOS, click on Advanced then Power. In the Secondary Power Settings window, change the setting for the After Power Failure parameter to Stay Off.

 

Hope this helps,

...S

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Beginner
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Apologies for my typo in the above msg which I've corrected. It should have said that the NUC is NOT switching on when plugged into the mains even without the SSD in it. I can't even get into BIOS Setup with it either.

 

Anyhow - thanks for all the help. The NUC is going back to Scan UK today for replacement, and a new SSD arrived from Amazon this morning.

 

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Beginner
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Hey Thread, I have the exact same problem. My Hades Canyon NUC wouldn't turn on after been shut down overnight. So I had to open the case and disconnect the battery. Then I the power button would react again.

Same story for 3 days.

Now my SSD died: First it was showing an SMART error now it disappeared from the bios at all. Still having the same power on issues.

I never had problems like this on any pc or laptop.

I am using the latest BIOS and an WD 240gb m.2 SSD.

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Beginner
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what did you end up doing ? did you buy a new ssd ?

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