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What's special about Static Update Partial Reconfiguration?

dj-park
New Contributor I
520 Views

I am comfortable with AMD(Xilinx) Partial Reconfiguration but new to Intel PR. I've found "Static Update Partial Reconfiguration" feature for Intel PR.

But I don't understand how different it is to have a SUPR(static update partial reconfiguration) region from to have an additional regular PR partition.

It says that  a portion of the static region can change with SUPR, but can't I just create another regular PR region to achieve exactly same thing that can be done with SUPR region?

 

Thanks,

DJ

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sstrell
Honored Contributor III
485 Views

Again, if you think you might want or need to make changes to the static region, which normally must be completely fixed and not changed at all, using SUPR can save you some time and headache.  Also note that some resources in the static region, like I/O, cannot be part of a PR region so they can't be PR'ed during runtime anyway.  

If something in your static region can be part of a PR region, then sure, create another PR region for it, isolating it from the static region.

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sstrell
Honored Contributor III
497 Views

The idea behind SUPR is that normally, if you change anything in the static region of a PR design, you have to completely recompile the static and PR regions (base and implementation revisions).  With SUPR, you can change part of the static region without having to do all the recompiling.  The difference from just creating another PR region is that the SUPR region cannot be switched to other logic during runtime.  Standard PR regions can be swapped with other personas at any time while the design is running.

The main idea is to save compiles if you think you may need to make changes to your static region design.  See the app note: https://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/programmable/us/en/pdfs/literature/an/an818.pdf

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dj-park
New Contributor I
488 Views

Thanks for the reply. But your answer is exactly my point.

As a user, why would I need to use SUPR not the standard PR? It looks like SUPR is just a subset of standard PR because standard PR region provides more functionality(can be even swapped while the other parts of the design are running).

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sstrell
Honored Contributor III
486 Views

Again, if you think you might want or need to make changes to the static region, which normally must be completely fixed and not changed at all, using SUPR can save you some time and headache.  Also note that some resources in the static region, like I/O, cannot be part of a PR region so they can't be PR'ed during runtime anyway.  

If something in your static region can be part of a PR region, then sure, create another PR region for it, isolating it from the static region.

SyafieqS
Moderator
467 Views

May I know if there is any update from previous reply?


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SyafieqS
Moderator
440 Views

We do not receive any response from you to the previous reply that I have provided, thus I will put this case to close pending. Please post a response in the next 15 days to allow me to continue to support you. After 15 days, this thread will be transitioned to community support. The community users will be able to help you with your follow-up questions. 


p/s: If any answer from community or Intel support are helpful, please feel free to mark as solution and give Kudos.


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