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Valued Contributor III
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MAX10 RSU: Dual Config IP vs User Logic

What are the Pros and Cons of using User Logic versus the Dual Configuration IP core to access the MAX10 RSU? Size? Capabilities? Are there cases where one is preferred over the other? 

 

Thanks
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Valued Contributor III
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Well, there's really no comparison because the dual configuration IP is required to even use the feature. See this online training and its follow-on for details: 

 

https://www.altera.com/support/training/course/omaxrsu101.html 

 

Perhaps you mean using a Nios for controlling the IP vs. something like a user-designed state machine?
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Valued Contributor III
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--- Quote Start ---  

Well, there's really no comparison because the dual configuration IP is required to even use the feature. See this online training and its follow-on for details: 

 

https://www.altera.com/support/training/course/omaxrsu101.html 

 

Perhaps you mean using a Nios for controlling the IP vs. something like a user-designed state machine? 

--- Quote End ---  

 

 

 

On page 13 of the MAX10 Configuration User Guide it states:  

there are two methods to access remote system upgrade in intel max 10 devices: 

• altera dual configuration ip core 

• user interface 

 

In addition there seems to be 2 "reference designs": One where a NIOS receives config data over a UART control the RSU process. This design uses the Dual Configuration IP core. 

 

The second reference design has an I2C slave MAX10 device. In this design there is no NIOS in the slave and no Dual Configuration IP core. The slave device receives config data over the I2C interface and has user logic to manage the RSU process (using the fiftyfivenm_rublock module). 

 

Both methods look like they manage dual compressed flash images. Apologies if I am missing something. 

 

Thanks.
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Valued Contributor III
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You can access the RSU circuitry directly via the fiftyfivenm_rublock (forgot about that method because I've never done it), but it's a lot easier to use the IP. You don't have to worry about building a state machine to manipulate the signals directly. As far as size (I guess you mean resources) are concerned, it's easy enough to add it to a design to see how much the IP uses, but I can't imagine it would be a lot.

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